Category: crypto exchange

Bakkt sheds more than 6% on first of public trading

Bakkt sheds more than 6% on first of public trading

Bakkt ($BKKT), an institutional and retail-facing digital asset platform founded by Intercontinental Exchange, has suffered a drawdown of -6.4% after closing a volatile first day of trading as a publicly listed company.After launching on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) at $9.45 on the morning of Oct. 18, BKKT rose by roughly 3.3% up to $9.77 during its first 30 minutes of trading. However, traders quickly moved to take profits, causing prices to slump by -9.5% down to $8.84 followed by lunchtime.According to Bloomberg, BKKT was trading at $8.76 by the day’s close after having shed almost -7% from its opening. Bakkt went public via a merger deal with a special purpose acquisition company (SPAC), VPC Impact Acquisition Holdings on Oct. 15.Bakkt initially launched in 2018 as a cryptocurrency custodian. The firm has since pivoted to launch institutional-facing bitcoin futures contracts and a retail crypto asset payments app.Related: Crypto finserv firm Bakkt to soon trade publicly on New York Stock ExchangeBakkt is not Intercontinental Exchange’s first foray into cryptocurrency, with the firm having participated as a lead investor in Coinbase’s Series C $75 million funding round in January 2015Like Bakkt, Coinbase posted a bearish performance for its first day of public trading, shedding -13.8% from a starting price of $381 over the course of the day. Intercontinental Exchange sold their stake in Coinbase for $1.2 billion during the first quarter of 2021.Earlier this month, Bakkt announced partnered with Google to enable its retail app users to make payments from their digital asset balances using Google Pay.

Coinbase Publishes Proposal for Crypto Regulation Pushing 4 Core Recommendations

Coinbase Publishes Proposal for Crypto Regulation Pushing 4 Core Recommendations

Cryptocurrency exchange Coinbase has published its proposal for crypto regulation after “more than 75 meetings with stakeholders in government, industry, and academia,” CEO Brian Armstrong revealed. In its Digital Asset Policy Proposal, the company recommends “four core pillars to inform future U.S. regulation.”
Coinbase’s Proposal for Crypto Regulation
The Nasdaq-listed cryptocurrency exchange Coinbase published its Digital Asset Policy Proposal (DAPP) Thursday.
Coinbase CEO Brian Armstrong tweeted: “Today we’re launching our Digital Asset Policy Proposal (DAPP) which we hope will help chart a course for clear regulation of cryptocurrency and web 3.0 in the U.S. It’s critical to bring clarity to this space and ensure America remains a financial leader.” He further shared:
This is not about Coinbase — we completed more than 75 meetings with stakeholders in government, industry, and academia to help shape this proposal, and we feel it represents a consensus point of view. It’s inclusive and democratic by design.
Coinbase recently experienced firsthand the lack of regulatory clarity when it tried to launch a lending program. The company met with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to discuss the product. However, the SEC said it was a security and threatened to sue the company if it went ahead with the program. Coinbase subsequently abandoned its plan to launch the Lend product and unveiled its plan to create a proposal for crypto regulation.
The company’s chief policy officer, Faryar Shirzad, explained Thursday that the goal of Coinbase’s proposal is to “engage in the public conversation about the future of our financial system.” The company believes that the conversation should focus on “The blockchain-driven and decentralized evolution of the internet” and “The emergence of a distinctive asset class that is digitally native and empowers unique economic use cases.”
Shirzad continued:
We recommend four core pillars to inform future U.S. regulation.
Firstly, “We need a new and digitally-native framework for how we regulate digital assets – one that doesn’t encumber innovation, inclusion, and financial empowerment for all sectors of society,” he stated.

Secondly, Coinbase’s chief policy officer detailed:
End-to-end crypto services must sit within a single regulator. Its authority would include a new registration process established for marketplaces for digital assets (MDAs).
In addition, Coinbase suggested instilling consumer confidence “by providing robust customer protection.” Shirzad noted, “This can be achieved through enhanced transparency processes, including tailored disclosures to inform purchasers of digital assets.”
The fourth point is to “promote interoperability and fair competition.” Coinbase believes that “To realize the full potential of digital assets, MDAs must be interoperable with products & services across the cryptoeconomy.” Shirzad added that “This can empower and protect a thriving consumer and developer ecosystem.”
Coinbase said that anyone wanting to comment on its crypto regulatory proposal can do so on Github.
What do you think about Coinbase’s crypto regulatory proposal? Let us know in the comments section below.

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Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only. It is not a direct offer or solicitation of an offer to buy or sell, or a recommendation or endorsement of any products, services, or companies. Bitcoin.com does not provide investment, tax, legal, or accounting advice. Neither the company nor the author is responsible, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on any content, goods or services mentioned in this article.

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Binance continues push to become regulated crypto exchange with new hire

Binance continues push to become regulated crypto exchange with new hire

Crypto exchange giant Binance has hired Mark McGinness, former head of international relations at the Dubai Financial Services Authority (DFSA), as its chief regulatory liaison officer.According to an announcement issued on Thursday, Binance stated that McGinness will contribute to the company’s push toward better relations with regulatory bodies across the globe.Indeed, McGinness is the latest Binance hire with expertise in regulatory compliance and engagement with financial regulators. Before his stint with the DFSA, McGinness was also the head of international relations at the Australian Securities and Investment Commission.The former DFSA executive has also held advisory positions at the International Monetary Fund.In a conversation with Cointelegraph, McGinness stated that he plans to leverage the experiences gained and relationships cultivated during the course of his career to improving Binance’s standing with regulators, adding:“I am looking forward to bringing this experience to Binance where I shall be working with these industry leaders and policymakers to assist not only in setting best practice and regulatory frameworks but also in broadening their understanding of the blockchain and crypto industry.”Commenting on McGinness joining the Binance compliance team, the company’s CEO, Changpeng Zhao, identified the former DFSA executive’s 30 years of experience working with regulators and other policymakers around the world.Zhao called McGinness’ appointment “a huge step forward” for Binance, especially as the business tries to navigate a stricter crypto regulatory climate.Related: Binance hires former IRS-CI special agent to head intelligence divisionAs previously reported by Cointelegraph, Binance has been forced to discontinue several crypto trading services in many jurisdictions around the world. In September, Binance blocked fiat deposits and spot crypto trading services for users in Singapore. The platform has also stopped offering crypto futures trading in Australia.The exchange giant continues to be the subject of significant scrutiny from state agencies, many of which say Binance is not licensed to operate in their respective jurisdictions.McGinness told Cointelegraph that Binance maintains a long-term commitment to the industry and is keen to create a “sustainable ecosystem around blockchain technology.”“In addition to localizing our operations and business to comply with local regulations, we are striving for productive dialogue with regulators so that we can formulate best practices and regulations that are for the long-term benefit of all participants,” McGinness wrote to Cointelegraph.Earlier in October, reports emerged that Binance may situate its headquarters in Ireland. The exchange has been the subject of “globe-trotting” accusations by critics who say the platform’s actions are indicative of attempts to circumvent regulatory provisions.

Moscow Not Planning to Ban Russians From Buying Crypto Abroad

Moscow Not Planning to Ban Russians From Buying Crypto Abroad

Russia is not going to follow China’s course and does not plan to ban its citizens from purchasing cryptocurrency on foreign exchanges, a high-ranking government official has indicated. Russians will not be able to pay with digital coins in their own country but are free to use crypto wallets beyond its borders.
Russians Can Purchase Cryptocurrencies on Foreign Exchanges
Unlike the Chinese government, authorities in Moscow do not intend to impose restrictions on the purchase of cryptocurrency on digital asset exchanges based abroad, a statement by Russia’s deputy minister of finance Alexey Moiseev has revealed. Speaking to reporters this week, he noted that settlements in cryptocurrency are prohibited in the country but explained:
At the same time, citizens can buy [cryptocurrencies] and use wallets outside the Russian Federation. It will remain so, I think. There are no plans to change anything yet.
On Tuesday, during a lecture devoted to the digitalization of financial markets at the Moscow State Institute of International Relations (MGIMO), Moiseev reiterated that Russia will not allow cryptocurrency to be used as a means of payment within the country. Quoted by Interfax, the government official said:
The position now is to ban operations with cryptocurrencies on the territory of the Russian Federation.
Answering questions from students, he pointed out that allowing crypto payments could lead to loss of control over money supply and insisted the matter comes down to financial sovereignty. Nevertheless, Alexey Moiseev added that regardless of the ban, Russians can have a cryptocurrency wallet outside the country.

The deputy finance minister also emphasized that many new financial terms, such as digital currency and blockchain information, will have to be defined in Russia’s Civil Code and other relevant laws. He further elaborated:
Blockchain will obviously occupy its own niche and will be used where equal rights are needed.
However, Moiseev’s comments come after last week’s statement by the head of the parliamentary Financial Market Committee, Anatoly Aksakov, who revealed that Russian lawmakers are considering legal restrictions on the amount of money non-qualified investors will be allowed to put into crypto assets. Aksakov believes the measures are needed to protect private investors in Russia as cryptocurrencies attract billions of dollars around the world.
Do you think Russia will maintain its current policy regarding crypto purchases on foreign exchanges? Tell us in the comments section below.

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Bank Of England Seeks To Strengthen Cryptocurrency Regulations

Bank Of England Seeks To Strengthen Cryptocurrency Regulations

John Culifferthe, Bank of England’s Deputy Governor, discouraged crypto’s use in the UK’s finance system. He announced earlier that although cryptocurrencies are becoming more supported within United Kingdom’s financial system, they aren’t a significant threat.
However, he also recommended that enhanced regulations should be enforced as digital currencies constantly expand.
Related Reading | New To Bitcoin? Learn To Trade Crypto With The NewsBTC Trading Course
The bank stated in a publication that there is a need to regulate cryptocurrency at a local and an international level.
Earlier in July, the bank warned against cryptocurrency spillover into traditional markets. It also said about banks, institutional investors, and payment operators’ absorption of cryptocurrency for transactions.
Cryptocurrency Price Appreciation
While cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin, Ethereum, and Tron prices spiked at the year’s first half. Just briefly, it climbed to $2.5 trillion in value. Collateral backers for the Bitcoin protocol promised to provide another store of value while the storers struggled to yield, given its meager interest rates.

The cryptocurrency market is currently facing a decline | Source: Crypto Total Market Cap on TradingView.com
On the contrary, cryptocurrencies have very high volatility, and the digital currency market has dipped more than $1 trillion in market value since May 2021. Bitcoin’s price has dropped from an ATH (All-Time-High) price of almost $65,000 in April this year to about $32,000 on Wednesday this week.
Financial Regulators Issue Warnings
Regulators have been giving frequent warnings about cryptocurrency. In particular, China has banned all digital transactions, declaring them illegal.
Related Reading | Shiba Inu Outranks Chainlink And Takes Place In Top 15 Crypto-Assets
However, Binance – the world’s biggest crypto exchange- was banned last month from the United Kingdom. Binance was among the numerous exchanges that didn’t register with the financial regulator, given that it couldn’t meet up with the anti-money laundering requirements.
Featured image from Pixabay, chart from TradingView.com

Major Turkish Crypto Exchange Coinzo Shuts Down

Major Turkish Crypto Exchange Coinzo Shuts Down

Coinzo, one of Turkey’s largest cryptocurrency exchanges, is terminating its digital asset trading services. The platform said its website will remain online in the next six months to allow users to withdraw their holdings in cryptocurrency and Turkish fiat money.
Another of Turkey’s Crypto Exchanges Closes Amid Ankara’s ‘War’ on Cryptocurrency
Leading Turkish crypto exchange Coinzo announced on Monday it’s ending trading operations. The platform called on customers to withdraw their assets in Turkish lira and cryptocurrency without providing any particular reason for its decision to exit the market. In a notice published on its website, the company stated:
 We have decided to terminate our digital asset service provider (cryptocurrency platform) service.
The exchange emphasized that its website, Coinzo.com, will continue to be accessible for another six months, during which traders will be able to log in to their accounts and withdraw Turkish lira and cryptocurrencies. All features will be available except the purchase and sell options.
“Our support team will continue to provide solutions to our users’ problems during this process,” Coinzo added. It also assured that “all Turkish lira and crypto money assets belonging to our users are safe.” Cryptocurrency holdings that are below the minimum withdrawal limit will be credited to users’ accounts in Turkish lira within a week of the announcement.

The exchange revealed that it had already suspended the Turkish lira’s trading pair with its own Coinzo token (CNZ) so that its holders are not affected by price changes after the closure announcement. CNZ balances will be converted at the last transaction rate of 1.516 lira per coin and amounts transferred within seven working days.
Withdrawals in Turkish lira can be made to a bank account that matches the name and surname in a verified Coinzo account. The platform is not going to charge the usual fiat withdrawal commission and the minimum withdrawal limit has been set to 0.1 lira. It has also provided detailed instructions on how to withdraw crypto assets to another wallet.
Coinzo, operated by a company based in the city of Izmir, is one of the five largest exchanges in Turkey, according to a report by the Turkish news portal Diken. The publication claims the crypto platform was registering close to 500 million lira (over $55 million) in daily trading volumes.
President of Turkey Recep Tayyip Erdoğan
The collapse of Coinzo follows that of other Turkish cryptocurrency exchanges such as Thodex and Vebitcoin. The two halted operations earlier this year after TCMB, the central bank of Turkey, prohibited the use of cryptocurrencies for payments. Following the ban, Turkish authorities also updated crypto regulations in May, introducing stricter requirements for local crypto trading service providers.
The news of Coinzo’s decision to close down comes after President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan stated in September that Turkey is “at war” with cryptocurrency, despite earlier reports that the Turkish government had prepared a draft law to regulate the country’s crypto space, expected to enter parliament this October. In July, deputy minister of treasury and finance, Şakir Ercan Gül, was quoted as saying that “those that ban [cryptocurrencies] are generally countries with democracy problems.” His comments suggested that Turkey will follow in the footsteps of the West in terms of its regulatory approach to the industry.
Do you think other Turkish crypto exchanges will go out of business in the near future? Share your expectations in the comments section below.

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Court Ruling Threatens 17 Crypto Exchanges in Russia

Court Ruling Threatens 17 Crypto Exchanges in Russia

Another batch of Russian online crypto exchanges in Russia face closure following a recent decision by a regional court. Information published on their websites has been deemed illegal meaning the country’s telecom watchdog can block access to their platforms.
Roskomnadzor May Take Down Blacklisted Crypto Exchanges
A number of websites providing options to exchange, cash out, and transfer cryptocurrency using various payment methods may be blocked by Russia’s telecom regulator, Roskomnadzor, if their operators don’t delete the illegal web pages. The threat for the online crypto platforms stems from a court ruling recognizing their content as prohibited.

In early September, the Kushnarenkovsky District Court in Bashkortostan, a republic of the Russian Federation, confirmed that the information they are disseminating is banned under current law, Forklog reported. The register of banned Russian websites, maintained by the non-government organization Roskomsvoboda, lists 17 sites affected by the decision.
In its ruling, the regional court notes that in all these cases the platforms have allowed free access without requiring registration. “Any user can get acquainted with the content and copy the materials in electronic form. There are no restrictions on their transfer, copying and distribution,” the district court emphasized.

According to Digital Rights Center, a law firm hired by the operators of six of the crypto exchanges, the owners of the websites had not been summoned by the court at all. Sarkis Darbinyan, managing partner at the company, explained that apparently the sites had been identified on the Bestchange.ru crypto exchange aggregator.
In the past few years, websites featuring content related to bitcoin and crypto services have often been targeted with restrictive measures in Russia. Roskomnadzor blocked Bestchange.ru more than once but access to the popular site has been eventually restored. In March 2020, the agency added six crypto sites to its register of banned internet sources and in June this year, a court in the Perm region announced its decision to block several crypto trading websites.
Lawyers at Digital Rights Center are now preparing official complaints with the intention to seek the full cancellation of the court decision. “Apparently, prosecutors do not want to accept the reality that the law on digital assets has already been adopted and the legislator did not follow the path of a complete ban on cryptocurrency, but only limited the possibilities of its use and civil law turnover,” Darbinyan concluded.
Do you think the Russian crypto exchangers and their defense will be able to secure a reversal of the court’s decision? Tell us in the comments section below.

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Uzbekistan Warns Citizens to Avoid Unlicensed Cryptocurrency Exchanges

Uzbekistan Warns Citizens to Avoid Unlicensed Cryptocurrency Exchanges

A government agency in Uzbekistan has published a list of unauthorized crypto exchanges that residents of the country have been advised to avoid. The trading platforms collect personal data and bear no responsibility for the cryptocurrency transactions, officials have warned.
Authorities in Uzbekistan Blacklist ‘Unofficial’ Crypto Exchanges
The National Agency of Project Management under the President of Uzbekistan has identified a number of online platforms offering crypto trading services without authorization. During a monitoring campaign on the internet, the body registered an increase in activities of such “unofficial” digital asset exchanges.
The entities behind them offer Uzbekistani citizens the option to buy, sell or trade crypto assets without having an office in the country. They are usually registered in other jurisdictions and their servers are located abroad, but at the same time they collect personal information from residents of the Central Asian republic, the agency said in a notice published on its website.

Half a dozen crypto exchange websites targeting residents of Uzbekistan have been blacklisted: webmoneytashkent.com, wmztashkent.com, wm-torg.com, uzwmz.com, blockchainuz.com, and bitcointashkent.com. Similar services are offered through Telegram bots and groups as well. Their providers, the regulator noted, often remain completely anonymous and can quickly delete a channel.
Officials have stressed that these kinds of platforms do not bear any legal responsibility for crypto transactions between various parties and cannot guarantee their legitimacy. Furthermore, they cannot ensure the proper storage of personal data or preservation of confidentiality. The announcement states:
The Agency urges citizens to be as vigilant as possible, beware and not use services of such platforms, including so as not to become victims of fraud.

Uzbekistan legalized crypto trading in 2018 but then in December 2019 authorities in Tashkent effectively banned residents from purchasing cryptocurrencies though they were allowed to sell. The National Agency of Project Management has now reminded the public that in accordance with the presidential decree “On measures to develop the digital economy in the Republic of Uzbekistan” and the country’s law “On licensing and notification procedures,” the establishment of cryptocurrency exchanges is subject to licensing.
The government has tried to encourage certain crypto activities. In January 2020, Tashkent unveiled a plan to set up a national mining pool and the initiative was presented as a priority. The state also said it’s going to establish a licensed cryptocurrency exchange where miners will be able to sell their coins and promised to create a blockchain valley as well as introduce crypto tax exemptions. Uznex, a regulated trading platform operated by the South Korean entity Kobea Group, was launched later that month.
However, in September this year, a high-ranking central bank official was quoted as saying that cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin will never be recognized as legal tender. Speaking to local media, deputy chairman of the Central Bank of the Republic of Uzbekistan (CBU) Behzod Hamraev pointed out that unlike cryptocurrencies, the national fiat, the sum, is backed by the bank’s assets. He also expressed his opinion that bitcoin will never be equal to “world currencies” such as the dollar, euro, yen, and ruble.
What are your thoughts on this story? Tell us in the comments section below.

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Crypto Exchange Bitbay Passes Audit Under Estonia’s Tougher New Regulations

Crypto Exchange Bitbay Passes Audit Under Estonia’s Tougher New Regulations

Bitbay has become a fully licensed cryptocurrency exchange in Estonia which introduced stricter rules for the industry last year. The European trading platform has recently passed an independent audit that confirmed its “solvency, security and fiscal responsibility.”
Audit Examines AML and KYC Procedures at Bitbay
Bitbay, a leading crypto trading platform in Europe, is now a fully licensed and regulated exchange under Estonia’s stringent regulations imposed last fall. The company has been audited by an independent third party which thoroughly examined its accounting practices, including anti-money laundering (AML) and know-your-customer (KYC) procedures.
The inspection also verified the platform’s financial assets, including crypto and fiat funds, as well as the current state of user accounts. Income, revenue, and profit were analyzed too, and according to an announcement published on the exchange’s website on Wednesday, the audit has confirmed Bitbay is solvent, secure, and fiscally responsible.
Estonia tightened its licensing regime for crypto service providers in late 2020 and they are now required to meet the same standards as traditional financial institutions under the country’s Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing Act. In December, the Baltic nation’s Financial Intelligence Unit revoked more than 1,000 licenses previously issued to virtual currency firms.

Bitbay referred to the successful audit as a milestone, not only for the exchange itself but also the crypto industry in general. The company noted that “regulation is fundamental to creating a secure future for digital money and cryptocurrency exchanges.” It insisted that “only by bringing cryptocurrency into the light will we be able to open it up for everyone,” emphasizing its commitment to work with authorities to “transform how deposits, trades, and tax flow transparently to, through and from crypto exchanges.” Bitbay further pointed out:
For the million or so users on our platform across Europe, this certification should provide further comfort that their assets are in good hands.
Bitbay also published key figures from its financial statement. According to the provided data, the company has generated €8,849,686 in net revenue between October 2019 and December 2020, resulting in a net profit of €6,491,835 after tax. Its share capital is €100,000.
The crypto exchange was launched in Poland in 2014 but in the spring of 2018, it decided to leave its home country, citing difficulties with access to banking services. Bitbay announced a decision to move its exchange operations to Malta, another EU member state. The government of the “Blockchain Island” has been working to create a crypto-friendly business climate. Digital asset trading platform Crypto.com recently became the country’s first licensed exchange to offer bank transfers.
Do you think more cryptocurrency exchanges will be able to meet Estonia’s stricter regulatory requirements? Tell us in the comments section below.

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Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only. It is not a direct offer or solicitation of an offer to buy or sell, or a recommendation or endorsement of any products, services, or companies. Bitcoin.com does not provide investment, tax, legal, or accounting advice. Neither the company nor the author is responsible, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on any content, goods or services mentioned in this article.

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Pan-African Exchange Yellow Card Raises $15 Million in Latest Funding Round

Pan-African Exchange Yellow Card Raises $15 Million in Latest Funding Round

Yellow Card, an Africa-focused crypto exchange platform, recently announced a capital raise of $15 million from its Series A funding round. The capital raise, which is Yellow Card’s largest, was led by Valar Ventures, Third Prime, and Castle Island Ventures. Square, Coinbase Ventures, and Blockchain.com Ventures also participated in the round.
Making Cryptocurrencies Accessible
According to the exchange platform’s blog post, part of the funds raised will be used to “ramp up hiring and continue its expansion across the continent.” On the other hand, Chris Maurice, founder and CEO of Yellow Card, said he expects the latest capital raise to help the fintech realize its goal of making cryptocurrencies accessible to everyone. Maurice said:
Our mission has always been to make cryptocurrency accessible anywhere and everywhere across the African continent. Now, we have the backing to make that a reality, alongside an amazing team of investors who share our vision.
Prior to raising the $15 million, Yellow Card already had “a presence in 12 countries [and] 110 employees across 16 countries.” This footprint is likely one of the reasons why the exchange platform was able to record “a nearly 30X increase in users across Africa since the start of the Pandemic.”

Capital Raise Highlights Investors’ Positive Perception of Africa
The same blog post also quotes James Fitzgerald of Valar Ventures explaining why his organization is betting on Yellow Card. Fitzgerald said:
“Africa is poised to benefit tremendously from cryptocurrency’s potential to transform financial services. We believe in Yellow Card’s vision of a Pan-African cryptocurrency platform. What cemented the deal is their multi-national team, which we believe has the local knowledge, technical expertise, and unequivocal passion to address the basic financial services needs of the continent.”
Although Africa is widely seen as the ideal market for cryptocurrencies, regulatory uncertainty and continuing reports of regulator pushback make the continent a risky investment destination. However, this lack of clarity has not stopped fintech start-ups like Yellow Card from expanding their operations.
In fact, as Munachi Ogueke, Yellow Card’s chief bitcoin officer concludes, the start-up’s $15 million capital raise itself is “a validation that Africa has a major place in the crypto industry.” The statement suggests the fintech start-up is not presently overly concerned with this lack of clarity or certainty. Instead, Yellow Card is more focused on its goal of becoming “a reliable enabler for people across the continent.”
What are your views on Yellow Card’s $15 million capital raise? Tell us what you think in the comments section below.

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Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only. It is not a direct offer or solicitation of an offer to buy or sell, or a recommendation or endorsement of any products, services, or companies. Bitcoin.com does not provide investment, tax, legal, or accounting advice. Neither the company nor the author is responsible, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on any content, goods or services mentioned in this article.

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